Honors Initiative

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Honors Initiative

Are you a driven student looking to dig deeper into topics in your courses, work with other dedicated students, and work more closely with your instructors?  If so, please think about taking one of Rowan College at Burlington County’s new honors courses. 

What are the benefits of an RCBC honors course?

  • Honors courses provide a huge advantage for transfer, resumes, and job applications.
  • With only twenty (20) students per class, there is more one-on-one interaction and support. 
  • With a smaller class size, there are more opportunities for guest speakers, class trips, group projects, and student/professor joint projects. 
  • The smaller class size means that not only will you get more attention and time with your instructor, but the students you will be working with will share your desire to learn.  Working with other driven students will create a strong learning environment where students encourage each other's ideas and successes.   This environment will also allow for more profound discussions and in-depth peer-to-peer interaction.

What RCBC honors courses are available?

Click on the links below to preview descriptions of the available honors courses and qualifications. Students must qualify for honors courses, and classes are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in each honors course is twenty (20).

Honors History (HIS 101 and HIS 102)

Honors English (ENG 102)

Honors General Chemistry I (CHE 115)

Honors Calculus I and Analytic Geometry (MTH 118)

How to enroll in honors courses:

In order to choose which courses to enroll in, consider the following: What courses interest you most? In which subjects have you previously excelled? For which courses are you already qualified? Once you have chosen the honors courses you would like, make sure you meet the qualifications OR take any additional testing needed in order to qualify.  Then, you can enroll in the honors courses of your choice.  No additional steps need to be taken.  If you meet the qualifications, you will be able to register.

If you would like to register for an Honors course but do not meet the criteria listed, please contact the faculty member assigned to the class you would like to take. Special cases may be considered.

*Students must meet qualifying standards and/or placement tests must be completed prior to enrolling in the course.  Academic advisors and course instructors can assist students if needed.  

Honors Course Offerings

Honors History:

In the History Honors classes, students learn the skills needed to help lead class discussion and play an active role as an historian.  The course includes the close reading of sources from the eras that are studied.  It also includes a look at how history is presented to the public through the careful study of visual sources, including pictures, movies, and TV shows. Less time is spent on lecture and more time is spent looking at these sources.  Assignments include a paper and presentation that examine one of these sources as well as a final research project and presentation. 

*Examples include:

Honors History 101:
The Declaration of Independence
Accounts of the Boston Massacre
John Adams (HBO TV series)
Lincoln (2012 Movie)

Honors History 102:
FDR’s “Day of Infamy Speech”
13 Days (2000 movie about Cuban Missile Crisis)
Martin Luther King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”

*Note: Authors and works may vary as per professor’s discretion.

Course Requirements:
Liberal Arts Honors: (to take Honors English 102, Honors History 101, and/or Honors History 102)

New or Returning Students:

Option 1: SAT Verbal Score of 560 or higher
Option 2: English Advanced Placement Test Score of 4 or higher
Option 3: Writeplacer Score of 6 or higher

Returning Students ONLY:

Option 4: Grade of B+ or higher in ENG 101

Honors English 102:

In the English honors course, students learn the skills needed to be more active close readers. The course includes more advanced research on both the assigned works of literature and the historical and social contexts of each piece, and the focus is on discussion instead of lecture. Assignments include papers as well as individual and group projects. Potential authors include Junot Diaz, Edwidge Danticat, August Wilson, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.*

*Note: Authors and works may vary as per professor’s discretion.

Course Requirements:  See above under Liberal Arts Honors Qualifications.

Honors General Chemistry I:

This class allows more class time for problem solving as opposed to lecturing. The number of chapters covered during the semester, as well as the number of exams and assignments, are the same in the honors section as in a regular section. The difference is Honors students read the textbook and watch lecture videos that cover some of the initial material in each chapter prior to class in order to free up class time for more in depth work. Likewise, students in the honors section will be completing open-ended exams and assignments as opposed to multiple-choice format. Group discussion is not stressed in the honors section, but always welcomed. 

Course Requirements: For Honors Chemistry, students must fulfill ONE requirement for EACH of the following:  Chemistry, Math, AND English.

MATH
(must meet one of the following)
SAT Math of 500 or higher OR College Level Math (CLM) score of 55 or higher
CHEMISTRY
(must meet one of the following)
High school Chemistry OR CHE 107/108
ENGLISH
(must meet one of the following)
Placement exam reading score of 71 or higher OR SAT Verbal score of 540 or higher

 

Honors Calculus I and Analytic Geometry (MTH-118):

The honors section of Calculus I and Analytic Geometry provides students a chance to extend deeper into calculus concepts. Honors students are expected to work both individually and in groups on challenging problems based around calculus content. Emphasis is on theory and application as opposed to computing. Students will be expected to explain their solutions using theorems covered in the course.

Course Requirements

Option 1:  "A" in MTH-130
Option 2:  85 or Higher on the College-Level Math (CLM) Test